A Positive Feedback Loop between Mesenchymal-like Cancer Cells and Macrophages Is Essential to Breast Cancer Metastasis (Cancer Cell 25, 605–620, May 12, 2014)

報告日期: 2014/10/24
報告時間: 4:00/4:50
報告學生: 陳智源
講評老師: 洪建中
附件下載: 下載[1421-1412163808-1.pdf] 

A Positive Feedback Loop between

Mesenchymal-like Cancer Cells and Macrophages

Is Essential to Breast Cancer Metastasis

 

Shicheng Su et al.

Cancer Cell 2014; 25, 605–620.

Speaker: Zhi-Yuan Chen                     Date: 2014/10/24 16:00-16:50

Commentator: Jan-Jong, Hung Ph.D.           Room: 602

 

Abstract

The tumor microenvironment is the cellular environment in which the tumor exists, including surrounding blood vessels, immune cells, fibroblasts, other cells, signaling molecules, and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tumor-associated macrophage (TAMs) is the most abundant immune-related stromal cells in tumor microenvironment, are key orchestrators of tumor microenvironment, directly affecting neoplastic cell growth, neo-angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling. TAMs of breast cancer often display an alternatively activated phenotype, promoting tumor invasion and metastasis, and associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. In addition, cancer cells can actively modulate nonmalignant stromal cells including macrophage. However, it is not yet known whether different kinds of cancer cells have different ability to modulate tumor microenvironment. In this study, authors investigated the interaction between cancer cells with EMT and TAMs is through mesenchymal-like breast cancer cells activate macrophages to a TAM-like phenotype by GM-CSF. Reciprocally, CCL18 from TAMs induces cancer cell EMT, forming a positive feedback loop. These findings suggest that a positive feedback loop between GM-CSF and CCL18 is important in breast cancer metastasis.

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